Bill Clinton: Hillary 'hasn't mentioned' possible 2016 run

Former President Bill ClintonBill ClintonOvernight Finance: Obama signs Puerto Rico bill | Trump steps up attacks on trade | Dodd-Frank backers cheer 'too big to fail' decision | New pressure to fill Ex-Im board Conservative group asks for probe of Lynch-Clinton meeting Trump: TPP will make NAFTA 'look like a baby' MORE joked Tuesday that his wife, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonAFL-CIO head: Trump’s ‘a fraud’ Sanders skirts Biden's claim that he'll endorse Clinton Overnight Cybersecurity: DNC hacker Guccifer 2.0 speaks out MORE, "hasn't mentioned" a possible presidential run in 2016.

“She’s taking a role in the foundation, she’s writing books, she’s having a little fun being a private citizen for the first time in 20 years,” the former president told an audience at a fiscal summit hosted by the Peter G. Peterson Foundation. 

“Hillary hasn’t mentioned it to me either,” Clinton said of a possible presidential bid.

He said that talking about 2016 "is the worst expenditure of our time" and is a sign of "attention deficit disorder" that puts politics above policy details. 

"We need to be worried about the work at hand," he said.

Clinton said doing a grand deficit deal that frees up money for investments in areas like research is needed so "whoever the next president is has an easier set of choices before him or her."

Clinton said that by already shifting focus to the next presidential race, Americans were avoiding "getting into the grimy details" of the real problems facing the nation.

The former president said media and politicians should instead spend their time making sure that “whoever the next president is has an easier set of choices before him or her.”

A Quinnipiac poll released last Thursday suggests Hillary Clinton would be the clear front-runner in the Democratic primary, were she to run. The former first lady wins the support of 65 percent of Democratic voters compared to 13 percent for Vice President Biden and 4 percent for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

President Clinton also said that the current White House occupant faces tough challenges because of bans on earmarks that make traditional dealmaking more difficult.

"The White House can’t give things out the way they used to," Clinton noted.

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