GOP pounds Obama's immigration decision with legislation

"The idea of illegal immigrants receiving federal benefits like food stamps or Social Security is crazy to most Americans," Akin said. "We welcome legal immigrants who can contribute to these programs and then receive benefits for which they are legally eligible.

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"Unfortunately, the rule of law is under assault by the Obama administration, particularly when it comes to immigration. This has caused numerous states to enact their own state laws to protect their citizens and borders because the federal government has failed to act."

Akin added that federal social programs are already on unsustainable paths to meet obligations to U.S. citizens, and cited press reports saying that adding 5 million illegal couples would cost Social Security $500 billion.

His Validating Entitlement Recipients Through Indicated Federal Immigration Status (VERIFI) Act, H.R. 6000, is co-sponsored by Reps. Mo BrooksMo BrooksGOP bill would block undocumenteds from military service GOP rep: Muslims want to 'kill every homosexual' in the US House GOP avoids debate over immigration in defense bill MORE (R-Ala.), Paul BrounPaul BrounCalifornia lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner The Trail 2016: Let’s have another debate! MORE (R-Ga.), Trent FranksTrent FranksRyan treads carefully with Trump When Newt and Pence were on opposite sides House GOP defense policy bill conferees named MORE (R-Ariz.), Phil GingreyPhil GingreyBeating the drum on healthcare Former GOP chairman joins K Street Former Rep. Gingrey lands on K Street MORE (R-Ga.), Gregg Harper (R-Miss.), Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.), Walter Jones (R-N.C.), Jack Kingston (R-Ga.), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertFormer GOP congressman lobbying for electric cars Senate races heating up Tea Party class reassesses record MORE (R-Ariz.) and Lynn Westmoreland (R-Ga.).

Also Thursday, Rep. Michael BurgessMichael BurgessGoonies, Pokemon and ‘transsexual shake’ speak to raucous scene at convention FDA to finalize rules on lab tests over GOP opposition Lawmakers: Smartphone health apps need to be smarter MORE (R-Texas) introduced a bill that would prohibit DHS from granting a work authorization to an alien found to have been unlawfully present in the United States. Burgess and other Republicans have criticized the administration's decision not just for what they said is selective enforcement of U.S. immigration law, but for the decision to encourage illegal immigrants under 30 to apply for work authorization in the United States.

The GOP has said that decision pits unemployed U.S. workers against illegal immigrants for jobs.

"With over 12 million Americans unemployed, President Obama showed that he is not concerned with policies that will put them back to work," Burgess said last week. "Instead, he wants to put illegal immigrants ahead of the rule of law and provide them with work permits."

While Republicans have introduced a handful of bills to counter Obama's immigration decision, GOP leaders in the House have so far been mum on whether they will schedule votes on these bills. But Republicans appear split on whether to fight the decision aggressively, or to be more wary of how the issue is playing out politically, and let GOP presidential front-runner Mitt Romney take the lead.

On Thursday, House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorThree strategies to help Clinton build 'Team of Teams' David Brat may run for Senate if Kaine becomes VP The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-Va.) did not mention any bills related to immigration that the chamber would take up next week, before the July 4 break.

Earlier this week, Rep. Ben Quayle (R-Ariz.) offered a bill that would prohibit DHS from implementing the administration's policy announcement. The announcement took the form of a memo from DHS that said it would exercise discretion on how it would enforce deportation proceedings against illegal immigrants.

Schweikert, who is in a primary runoff against Quayle, introduced a separate bill prohibiting executive orders on immigration from being followed, although the Obama administration's decision did not come in the form of an executive order.

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