Senate Democrats on Friday took aim at the Republican majority on the other side of the Capitol, blasting the GOP on a range of issues.

Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerCarly Fiorina 'certainly looking at' Virginia Senate run Top Obama adviser signs with Hollywood talent agency: report 
Democrats vie for chance to take on Trump as California governor MORE (D-Calif.), the chairwoman of the Environment and Public Works Committee, hit Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), her counterpart in the House, over his stated intention to weaken the Environmental Protection Agency.

Boxer also voiced her discontent over a change in House rules enacted on Wednesday that will allow federal money normally allotted to building roads to be used for other purposes. 

Boxer’s criticism was notable in that she did not invoke the name of any members of the Senate and instead just hammered at Upton, the new chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Other Senate Democrats, including Conference Vice Chairman Charles SchumerCharles SchumerEllison holds edge in DNC race survey Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump defends Flynn, blasts leaks | Yahoo fears further breach Overnight Finance: Trump's Labor pick withdraws | Ryan tries to save tax plan | Trump pushes tax reform with retailers MORE (N.Y.), Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinA guide to the committees: Senate McConnell: I’m very sympathetic to 'Dreamers' Senate Dems move to nix Trump's deportation order MORE (Ill.) and Sen. Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowA guide to the committees: Senate Trump's pick to lead Medicare won't say if she supports negotiating prices with drug companies Overnight Finance: Fed chief tries to stay above partisan fray | Bill would eliminate consumer agency | Trump signs repeal of SEC rule on foreign payments MORE (Mich.) also held a joint press conference earlier in the day to chide House Republicans for “already spending millions more than they want to cut.” 

The criticism from Senate Democrats suggests concern about the new GOP majority, and reflects the changing power in Washington.

House Republicans this week have also expressed concern about the Senate, where Democrats continue to hold a majority. Republicans can expect a number of the bills they pass, such as a repeal of the healthcare law, to die in the Senate.

House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorGOP shifting on immigration Breitbart’s influence grows inside White House Ryan reelected Speaker in near-unanimous GOP vote MORE (R-Va.) in a press conference this week warned the Senate that it would “have to answer to the American people” if it served as a “cul-de-sac.”