The debate so far has been largely repetitive of past positions. Democrats such as Rockefeller, Charles SchumerCharles SchumerThe Hill's 12:30 Report Why Democrats fear a successful inaugural address from Trump CBO: 18 million could lose coverage after ObamaCare repeal MORE (N.Y.) and Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowHillary gives Bernie cool reception at Trump inaugural lunch Overnight Finance: Scoop – Trump team eyes dramatic spending cuts | Treasury pick survives stormy hearing Dems blast Trump plans for deep spending cuts MORE (Mich.) warned that repealing the law would raise the deficit and limit healthcare options. Republicans such as John CornynJohn CornynSenate confirms first nominees of Trump era The new Washington elite schmoozes over lunch Top GOP senator warns of weekend work on Trump nominees MORE (R-Texas) took to the floor to say repeal is needed to limit government overreach and respect the demands of voters.

There is a possibility of a fight tomorrow over how to repeal the 1099 reporting requirements in last year's healthcare law. Sen. Mike JohannsMike JohannsTo buy a Swiss company, ChemChina must pass through Washington Republican senator vows to block nominees over ObamaCare co-ops Revisiting insurance regulatory reform in a post-crisis world MORE (R-Neb.) has introduced his own 1099 repeal language that would ask the Office of Management and Budget to rescind $39 billion in discretionary funds in order to make up for the cost of the proposal, an idea that most Democrats rejected.

The Democratic alternative was a bill from Sen. Max BaucusMax BaucusFive reasons why Tillerson is likely to get through Business groups express support for Branstad nomination The mysterious sealed opioid report fuels speculation MORE (D-Mont.) to repeal the 1099 language without paying for it, but this too was rejected. Stabenow put forward her own amendment to repeal the 1099 requirement, but it has not yet been released.