The FTC ruling means that Brian-Pad Inc. will no longer be able to make claims that its products reduce the risk of concussion without conducting a scientific study that proves those claims.

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"Increased awareness of the dangers associated with sports concussions is extremely important," said Udall. "But as the Brain-Pad settlement proves, some companies seem to be taking advantage of the fears of parents, coaches and athletes. The real danger behind anti-concussion marketing claims is in giving young athletes and their parents a false sense of security.”

Udall introduced the Children's Sports Athletic Equipment Safety Act, S. 601, which would increase potential penalties for companies using false injury prevention claims to sell helmets and other sports equipment. The bill would also ensure that new and reconditioned football helmets for high school and younger players meet safety standards that address concussion risks for young athletes.

"Concussions are a very serious health concern, especially for young athletes, and it is important that athletes, parents and coaches know the truth about the limitations of sports equipment in preventing concussions,” Rockefeller said.

Democratic Sens. Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalSenate Dems ask DHS inspector general for probe of Trump’s business arrangement If Gorsuch pick leads to 'crisis,' Dems should look in mirror first Senate Dems move to nix Trump's deportation order MORE (Conn.), Frank Lautenberg (N.J.) and Charles SchumerCharles SchumerOvernight Cybersecurity: Trump defends Flynn, blasts leaks | Yahoo fears further breach Overnight Finance: Trump's Labor pick withdraws | Ryan tries to save tax plan | Trump pushes tax reform with retailers Democrats declare victory after Puzder bows out MORE (N.Y.) are all co-sponsors of Udall's bill.