Sen. Paul: Clinton needs to answer for Libyan terrorist attack

“If ambassador Stevens signed a security request that was sent to Secretary Clinton, who subsequently denied that request, Secretary Clinton must answer these charges,” Paul said in a statement Friday.

ADVERTISEMENT
Paul said the administration has denied that Stevens requested additional security. Lawmakers have been demanding more information on the event, including all communications between Stevens and the State Department leading up to the attack.

“Administration officials, including Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe FCC’s Privacy Problem Strong, committed leadership needed to destroy ISIS Medical cures bill pushed back to lame-duck MORE, have repeatedly told us that more security was never requested in Libya,” Paul said. “If this is false, and security was requested — and was denied — administration officials must answer for this gross intelligence and security failure.”

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinOvernight Tech: Pressure builds ahead of TV box vote | Intel Dems warn about Russian election hacks | Spending bill doesn't include internet measure Intel Dems: Russia making 'serious effort' to influence US election GOP senators: Obama rebuffed negotiations on 9/11 bill MORE (D-Calif.) announced that she would hold a hearing on the attack in Benghazi after the election. The House has already started an investigation.

Paul said whoever is responsible for the deaths of the four Americans should be held accountable.

“The failure to protect our diplomats is an outrage and those who made bad decisions should either be fired or have their ability to make such decisions taken away from them,” Paul said. “Someone must answer for the tragedy in Benghazi.

“The President has told us ‘the buck stops here.’ It’s time for him to prove it.”

Last month, Clinton said she'd take responsibility for the lack of security during the attack in order "to avoid some kind of political gotcha" for the administration. The next day, in the second presidential debate, the president said that, “Secretary Clinton has done an extraordinary job but she works for me.”

“I’m the president and I’m always responsible.”

Before the Senate adjourned for the Nov. 6 election, Paul's bill, which would have ended all foreign aid to Libya until "they started acting like our allies," failed to pass.