State by state


Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard announced yesterday that he would seek the Republican nomination to challenge Sen. Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowGreat Lakes senators seek boost for maritime system Podesta floated Bill Gates, Bloomberg as possible Clinton VPs Dems to McConnell: Pass 'clean' extension of Iran sanctions MORE (D-Mich.) next year.

Bouchard joins Republicans Keith Butler and Jerry Zandstra in the primary.

While Butler has been more or less anointed the GOP nominee by leading Michigan Republicans, including members of the Michigan congressional delegation, many in the party are pessimistic about his chances of beating Stabenow, who is in her first term.

“Michael Bouchard has clearly responded to the lobbyists and powerbrokers in Washington who have recruited him with the promise of financial support,” said Butler, a former Detroit city councilman.

Bouchard, a former state senator, said he had received overwhelming encouragement from across the state to run.
— Peter Savodnik

Democrats are making Republican Rep. Tom DeLay’s defeat in 2006 a national cause — hosting fundraisers this month in Chicago and New York and, next month, in Boston, San Francisco and Los Angeles for his Democratic challenger, former Rep. Nick Lampson.

As Lampson travels across the country seeking support for his campaign against the embattled former House majority leader, he will be joined by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (Calif.); Rep. Rahm Emanuel (Ill.), chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC); and other Democratic members of Congress.

Lampson, first elected in 1996 in the old 9th District, lost his seat last year in a redrawn 2nd District to Republican Ted PoeTed PoeA clear signal on Georgia’s future Overnight Tech: Dem presses Facebook on gun sales | Praise for new librarian of Congress | Fourth Amendment Caucus to push privacy concerns Overnight Cybersecurity: Guccifer 2.0 releases more DNC docs; China hacked banking regulator MORE.

The Democrat has an uphill battle ahead: While he raised more than $321,000 in the third quarter of the year, bringing his cash on hand to nearly $690,000, DeLay raised more than $902,000 in the same period, ending with almost $1.2 million in the bank.
— Peter Savodnik

Rep. Dave ReichertDavid ReichertUS businesses can start applying for tariff reductions on scarce products House lawmakers call on Obama administration to oppose Iran joining global trade body Ryan: Pacific deal can't be fixed in time for lame-duck vote MORE (R-Wash.), has launched, with Rep. Juanita Millender-McDonald (D-Calif.), the Congressional Goods Movement Caucus, featuring “a progressive agenda that maximizes our nation’s freight capacity while addressing important homeland-security concerns,” according to a statement issued by Reichert.

The new caucus is likely to help Reichert, a former sheriff, burnish his bipartisan credentials as he heads into the 2006 election cycle. The congressman, who is on Republicans’ short list of endangered incumbents, is sure to face a tough reelection effort.

The congressman won his first term last year with 52 percent of the vote. His 8th District, in the Seattle suburbs, narrowly backed Sen. John KerryJohn KerryWhat would a Hillary Clinton presidency look like? 5 reasons Trump's final debate performance sealed his 2016 coffin US pledges to do all it can to fight 'grave threat' of nuclear North Korea MORE (D-Mass.) in 2004 and Vice President Al GoreAl GoreTrump is right, the system is rigged — and it has been for a long time Mark Cuban: Trump’s ‘denying democracy’ Trump: I'll accept election results — if I win MORE (D) in 2000.
— Peter Savodnik

Rep. Barbara Cubin (R-Wyo.) is hoping to dispel speculation that she will not run for a seventh term. After a published report noted that her cash-on-hand is below $79,000 and raised the possibility that she would retire, an irritated Cubin told The Hill, “I am definitely running.”

As a result of the article, Cubin said the National Republican Congressional Committee called to seek her plans for 2006. But Cubin stressed last week that she is not ready to pack it in.

The 58-year-old conservative won 55 percent of the vote last year while President Bush defeated Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) 69 to 29 percent in Wyoming. Cubin’s 11-point victory was her closest since being elected to Congress.
— Bob Cusack