Corker asks why U.S. officials can't get into Benghazi to investigate attack

A Senate Republican demanded answers on Saturday as to why U.S. officials can't get into Benghazi to investigate the Sept. 11 attack on the consulate.

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Sen. Bob CorkerBob CorkerHaley ready for UN role despite dearth of foreign policy experience Top Dem: Don’t bring Tillerson floor vote if he doesn’t pass committee Trump’s UN pick threads needle on Russia, NATO MORE, (R-Tenn.) sent a letter to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and other top Obama administration officials, asking why has the FBI been prevented from gaining access to the U.S. consulate in the Libyan city where four Americans were killed, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.

“As of this morning, reports indicate that our well-trained FBI agents still have not been able to get into Benghazi to investigate," he wrote.

"What has changed in Libya in such a short time that even FBI agents, our most elite investigative personnel, cannot safely enter the city? What has led to such a precipitous decline?”

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee member questioned why there was a lack of security for the ambassador and his staff and why the FBI is still unable to get into Benghazi.

“An unwillingness to provide answers and the inaccuracy of the limited information we have received to date has undermined the credibility of the administration," he wrote.

"To avoid further damage, I ask that you please personally respond with substantive answers very quickly.”

Corker is cosponsoring legislation with Senator Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) to require an investigation and report on recent attacks at U.S. missions in Libya, Egypt and Yemen.

On Tuesday, Corker joined Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonTrump, Democrats can bridge divide to make college more affordable Trump picks Obama nominee for VA secretary Five races to watch in 2017 MORE (R-Ga.) in a letter to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton demanding more details regarding the increasing threats and security concerns that preceded attacks in Benghazi.

Corker also joined all 19 members of the Foreign Relations panel to sign another letter this week to the State Department asking for information requested in the DeMint-Corker bill and an interim report and briefing regarding security and intelligence leading up to the Benghazi attack.