McConnell skewers Dem plan as ‘shockingly bad’


Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellRubio: GOP Congress could go in different direction than Trump Pelosi blasts GOP leaders for silence on Trump Reid: Groping accusations show Trump’s ‘sickness’ MORE (Ky.) slammed Democrats on Tuesday for trying to amend the Constitution to limit political spending and vowed the effort will “never” succeed.

“The First Amendment is about empowering the people, not the government. The proposed amendment has it exactly backwards. It says that Congress and the states can pass whatever law they want abridging political speech — the speech that is at the very core of the First Amendment,” McConnell said in rare testimony by a Senate leader before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

McConnell’s remarks followed Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidPelosi blasts GOP leaders for silence on Trump Latinos build a wall between Trump and White House in new ad The true (and incredible) story of Hill staffers on the industry payroll MORE’s (D-Nev.) testimony before the panel. Reid called on colleagues to adopt a constitutional amendment sponsored by Sens. Tom UdallTom UdallCourt ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada Tensions rise over judicial nominees Dem senator wants to change nomination rules amid Garland fight MORE (D-N.M.) and Michael BennetMichael BennetSenate poll raises Republican hopes in Pennsylvania, Florida Podesta floated Bill Gates, Bloomberg as possible Clinton VPs GOP Senate candidate reverses course, says he’ll vote Trump MORE (D-Colo.) that would empower Congress to regulate campaign fundraising.  

McConnell said the proposal does not have the slightest chance of passing.

“Now, everyone on this Committee knows this proposal is never going to pass Congress. This is a political exercise and that’s all it is,” he said.

McConnell said Reid and other Democratic leaders are pushing the amendment motivate liberal voters who often have lower rates of turnout during midterm elections.

“The political nature of this exercise should not obscure how shockingly bad this proposal is,” he said.

He emphasized that former Sens. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Russ Feingold (D-Wis.), leading Senate liberals of the past, opposed efforts to amend the Constitution to rein in fundraising activities.

“Our colleagues who voted against those proposals were right then. And I respectfully submit that they would be wrong now to support the latest proposal to weaken the First Amendment,” he said.