Sen. Moran takes early, and lonely, lead in race for NRSC chairman post

Sen. Jerry MoranJerry MoranYahoo reveals new details about security A guide to the committees: Senate Verizon, Yahoo slash merger deal by 0M over data breaches MORE (Kan.) is the early favorite to take over as chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) after the election. 

The reason? It’s a one-man race. 

The map for Senate Republicans in 2014 looks very favorable, but Moran is the only GOP member who has expressed an interest in the plum job.

Just over 40 days out from Election Day, Moran has begun to call colleagues to secure their support and fend off a possible leadership race. 

Several senators said they have talked to Moran about his ambitions for the job and have not heard from anyone else.  

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The names of Sens. Roy BluntRoy BluntA guide to the committees: Senate Judiciary Committee wants briefing, documents on Flynn resignation Intel Dem: House GOP now open to investigating Flynn MORE (R-Mo.), Marco RubioMarco RubioAt CPAC, Trump lashes out at media Conquering Trump returns to conservative summit Rubio brushes off demonstrator asking about town halls MORE (R-Fla.) and Bob CorkerBob CorkerA guide to the committees: Senate Republicans play clean up on Trump's foreign policy GOP Congress unnerved by Trump bumps MORE (R-Tenn.) have been floated as possible contenders, but all three lawmakers indicated to The Hill they are not interested.

Rubio told The Hill that he has not had any conversations with colleagues about the NRSC chairmanship and was not inclined to pursue it. However, he would not rule out the possibility.  

Sen. Ron JohnsonRon JohnsonA guide to the committees: Senate Hopes rise for law to expand access to experimental drugs Dems ask for hearings on Russian attempts to attack election infrastructure MORE (R-Wis.), who narrowly lost to Blunt in a race to become vice chairman of the Senate GOP conference, said he does not plan to challenge Moran.  

Party leaders have approached Corker in the past about chairing the NRSC because as a former CEO he has a natural rapport with business leaders who fit the committee’s donor profile. But Corker wants to focus on policy, specifically a grand bargain next year to cut the deficit.  

The NRSC chairmanship has been a springboard to the upper ranks of the Senate GOP leadership. 

Former Sen. Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) vaulted from the NRSC to Senate majority leader after helping Republicans capture the upper chamber in 2002. McConnell became Senate Republican whip after heading the NRSC in the 1998 and 2000 cycles.  

Moran, who was elected to the Senate in 2010 after serving 14 years in the House, has a reputation for being ambitious throughout his congressional career. The freshman has an accomplished record on agriculture issues and sits on the Appropriations Agriculture subcommittee.  

A spokeswoman for Moran said her boss is concentrating on helping GOP candidates this fall. 

“While he has been encouraged by his colleagues to give the NRSC a serious look, Sen. Moran continues to be focused on making certain Republicans gain a majority in the Senate and win the White House this November,” said Garrette Silverman. “Through his work with FreeState PAC, Sen. Moran is traveling the country to raise money and has given to nearly every Senate candidate this cycle.

“He is also serving as a co-chairman of the Romney Farm and Ranch team,” she added. 

One lawmaker cautioned that another contender could emerge because Republicans feel confident they will retake the Senate in 2014 —if not this cycle. 

“If Obama wins reelection, and it kind of looks that way now, the president’s party traditionally loses seats in the midterm of the second term. The Democrats have to defend more seats than us. All it’s going to take is a chairman who can walk and chew gum to win back the Senate,” said the source.  

Moran could face a challenge from Sen. Rob PortmanRob PortmanConquering Trump returns to conservative summit ­ObamaCare fix hinges on Medicaid clash in Senate A guide to the committees: Senate MORE (Ohio), the low-key Republican freshman who is most known for his policy expertise. Portman served on the deficit-reduction supercommittee this Congress and could immerse himself again in the debt debate next year. 

Portman could have Senate leadership ambitions since being passed over for Mitt Romney’s running mate. He is one of the biggest fundraisers among the Senate Republican freshman class. A Portman aide did not rule out a bid for NRSC chairman.  

“Rob will spend the next month and a half doing everything he can for Romney and [Rep. Paul] Ryan [R-Wis.] in Ohio and to ensure he has as many Republican colleagues as possible with him in the Senate next year. Anything past Election Day will be considered at that point,” said the aide.  

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Republicans must defend only 13 seats. The most vulnerable GOP seat might belong to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellThough flawed, complex Medicaid block grants have fighting chance Sanders: 'If you don't have the guts to face your constituents,' you shouldn't be in Congress McConnell: Trump's speech should be 'tweet free' MORE (R-Ky.), who has a $6 million war chest and represents a conservative-leaning state. 

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamThe Hill's 12:30 Report Back to the future: Congress should look to past for Fintech going forward CNN to host town hall featuring John McCain, Lindsey Graham MORE (R-S.C.) could come under threat from a conservative challenger. The Club for Growth, a free-market advocacy group, says it might oppose him in the 2014 GOP primary. 

Republicans have seen their chances of winning the Senate this year fall since early last year, when they felt assured of seizing the majority. Their prospects took a hit with the surprise retirement of Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) and Rep. Todd Akin’s (R-Mo.) controversial statement on rape, which spurred the NRSC and Crossroads GPS, a Republican super-PAC, to pull funding from the Missouri race. 

One GOP senator said there is limited interest in taking over the NRSC because the current chairman, Sen. John CornynJohn CornynCornyn: Border wall 'makes absolutely no sense' in some areas Ryan on border: ‘We will get this done’ Ryan tours Mexican border on horseback MORE (Texas), set such a high standard with his grinding work ethic. 

“We see John Cornyn in the airport almost every weekend flying to one part of the country or another,” said another lawmaker. 

Cornyn has benefited from representing Texas, the wealthiest red state in the nation and home to many super-rich conservative donors he can tap to support GOP candidates. A successor could be hard-pressed to match his fundraising productivity. 

Another GOP senator said Moran has a good chance of winning the chairmanship because he is the only person aggressively campaigning for it. 

Moran straddles the divide between Tea Party conservatives and mainstream Republicans. He is a member of the Senate’s Tea Party Caucus but more of a team player than Sens. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) and Rand PaulRand PaulConquering Trump returns to conservative summit Rand Paul rejects label of 'Trump's most loyal stooge' GOP healthcare plans push health savings account expansion MORE (R-Ky.), who have clashed with Republican leaders.

Moran last week backed Cornyn’s decision not to spend money to help Akin, while DeMint is pondering getting involved in the race.