Senator: Trio of likely 2016 GOP candidates gaming ObamaCare

Senator: Trio of likely 2016 GOP candidates gaming ObamaCare
© Greg Nash

Some Republicans who are seeking an “unrealistic” Obama-Care defunding plan are playing presidential politics, according to a conservative senator. [WATCH VIDEO]

“I think it was good for their presidential ambitions, but it’s not a realistic plan. I’m pretty sure their email lists got built [up],” Sen. Mike JohannsMike JohannsTo buy a Swiss company, ChemChina must pass through Washington Republican senator vows to block nominees over ObamaCare co-ops Revisiting insurance regulatory reform in a post-crisis world MORE (R-Neb.) told The Hill on Wednesday.

The most prominent proponents of the risky tactic, Sens. Marco RubioMarco RubioThe ignored question: What does the future Republican Party look like? Graham to roll out extension of Obama immigration program Trump and Cuba: A murky future MORE (R-Fla.), Ted CruzTed CruzTrump could be the most significant president of our time Cruz: I'd rather have Trump talk to Taiwan than Cuba or Iran Lewandowski: Top Cruz aide advised Trump team before NH primary MORE (R-Texas) and Rand PaulRand PaulGOP rep: Trump has 'extra-constitutional' view of presidency The ignored question: What does the future Republican Party look like? Rand Paul skeptical about Romney as secretary of State MORE (R-Ky.) are considered likely presidential candidates in 2016.

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They and other conservatives such as Sen. Mike LeeMike LeeWill Trump back women’s museum? Overnight Cybersecurity: Lawmakers pushing for vote to delay warrant rule changes Coons to call for voice vote to halt changes to hacking rule MORE (R-Utah) argue that Congress should not pass legislation funding the government beyond the end of the month unless it includes language defunding or delaying the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Many Republican lawmakers, however, fear the strategy could result in a government shutdown that would hurt their party’s brand.

Johanns said linking a possible government shutdown to the quest to defund ObamaCare has boosted the national profiles of some senators, but he warned it would not yield much benefit for other Republicans.

“It burst them to a national profile. They had a lot of talkers on radio, etc., talking about it,” he said. “My feeling is we just need to be honest with people. This has zero chance of being successful.”

Rubio responded Wednesday by framing the fight over ObamaCare as the biggest issue facing the Congress.

“There’s a disagreement about whether it’s the right tactic,” he said. “If there’s one issue that we should be willing to do everything we can, it should be this one. If there’s one issue that we should be willing to take to the limit, it’s this one. It’s that bad for the country.”

Rubio held events across Florida during the August recess to highlight what he sees as the disastrous economic consequences of the law.

Tensions are rising in the Senate Republican conference over the best tactical approach to defunding the healthcare law because some members have become the targets of pressure ads from conservative groups.

The Senate Conservatives Fund launched a $340,000 television ad buy earlier this month slamming Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellDriverless car industry embraces Trump’s Transportation pick Trump flirts with Dems for Cabinet Lawmakers eye early exit from Washington MORE (Ky.) for not doing more to fight the law’s implementation.

“McConnell is the Senate Republican leader, but he refuses to lead on defunding ObamaCare,” the ad’s narrator says. “What good is a leader like that?”

The group has spent about $230,000 targeting other Republican senators with radio ads, criticizing them for not backing the threatened government shutdown. The targets include Sens. Jeff FlakeJeff FlakeSenators crafting bill to limit deportations under Trump Interest groups keep the political ads coming Overnight Healthcare: Cures bill sails through House | Walden frontrunner for Energy and Commerce gavel MORE (Ariz.), Thad CochranThad CochranGOP senators voice misgivings about short-term spending bill Trump's wrong to pick Bannon or Sessions for anything Bottom Line MORE (Miss.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamA Cabinet position for Petraeus; disciplinary actions for Broadwell after affair Pentagon should have a civilian chief to give peace a chance Lawmakers eye early exit from Washington MORE (S.C.), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonGOP senators wary of nuking filibuster SENATE: Republicans defy odds to keep majority A banner year for U.S. leadership on aid effectiveness MORE (Ga.), Richard BurrRichard BurrDems pledge to fight Sessions nomination Battle for the Senate: Top of ticket dominates Shakeup on Senate Intel: Warner becomes top Dem MORE (N.C.) and Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderKey Republicans ask Trump to keep on NIH director McConnell tees up medical cures bill Speculation and starting points: accreditation, a new administration and a new Congress MORE (Tenn.).

“Jeff Flake won’t stand up to President Obama and join conservatives in pledging to oppose funding for the implementation of ObamaCare,” declares the narrator in one spot.    

McConnell has resisted endorsing the strategy for fear it could backfire.

“In the words of [conservative columnist] Charles Krauthammer, it’s a suicide note,” Sen. John McCainJohn McCainA Cabinet position for Petraeus; disciplinary actions for Broadwell after affair Meet Trump’s ‘mad dog’ for the Pentagon Wrestling mogul McMahon could slam her way into Trump administration MORE (R-Ariz.) said. “Until we have 67 votes in the Senate, we’re not going to be able to defund ObamaCare,”  referring to the number of votes necessary to overcome a presidential veto. 

Cruz urged using the government funding resolution as leverage to defund ObamaCare when he met with conservative activists at the Family Leadership Summit in Iowa last month. He’s not letting up despite his colleagues’ discomfort.

“We’re certainly continuing to press the case on every front,” he said Wednesday.

Matt Hoskins, executive director of the Senate Conservatives Fund, defended Rubio, Cruz and Paul.

“It’s amazing that whenever an elected official takes a principled stand, the establishment questions their motives,” he said.

None of three possible 2016 White House candidates spoke in favor of the government shutdown strategy at a Senate Republican meeting Wednesday where ObamaCare was a topic, according to one lawmaker who attended.

“That wasn’t the proper forum, with McConnell being targeted by ads because of their effort,” the source said.

The effort to use a possible government shutdown as leverage has put Paul in a tricky situation. He has signed a letter advocating for the tactic but he’s also an ally of McConnell, who could face a tough challenge in his state’s primary election next year. McConnell’s challenger in that race, Matt Bevin, has ripped the minority leader on ObamaCare.

When asked about the potential political impact on McConnell, Paul said: “Everybody has their own ideas about the best strategy for how to defeat ObamaCare, so I haven’t been part of any criticism of other senators for what strategy they determine is best.”

Cruz on Tuesday slammed a proposal offered this week by House GOP leaders as ineffective because it would force the Senate to vote on defunding ObamaCare before considering an extension of government funding. The House plan would not make government funding contingent on defunding the law.

“They should not use any procedural chicanery to enable [Senate Majority Leader] Harry ReidHarry ReidTrump gets chance to remake the courts Democrats local party problem Trump flirts with Dems for Cabinet MORE [D-Nev.] to circumvent that vote,” he said.

One Republican who attended Wednesday’s meeting said many of his colleagues have yet to take a position on the House resolution, which lacks the votes to pass the lower chamber. Some GOP members want to push for delaying ObamaCare while others prefer defunding it. 

There is growing concern among Senate Republicans about funding levels in the House bill, which would set spending at $986.3 billion through December, according to a Senate source. Several senators say that would exceed the $967 billion spending cap set by the 2011 Budget Control Act.