Winners and losers of the debt-limit fight


The 2013 fiscal showdown was ugly, especially for Republicans. [WATCH VIDEO]

Both parties have scoffed that there are winners and losers in the debate.

Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerLast Congress far from ‘do-nothing’ Top aide: Obama worried about impeachment for Syria actions An anti-government ideologue like Mulvaney shouldn't run OMB MORE (R-Ohio) recently said, “This isn’t a damn game!”

White House press secretary Jay Carney on Wednesday said “there are no winners” in the battle.

But in every political showdown, politicians rise and fall. This was no exception.

Winners

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThe DC bubble is strangling the DNC Dems want Sessions to recuse himself from Trump-Russia probe Ryan says Trump, GOP 'in complete sync' on ObamaCare MORE (D-Nev.). In 2011, Reid played a backseat role in the negotiations on lifting the debt ceiling. This time around, it was much different. Reid, a former boxer, stood in the middle of the ring as the House GOP bobbed and weaved. The wily Democrat, however, knew Republicans had no way out and would be forced to throw in the towel. Other than a gaffe in the middle of the battle, Reid played it perfectly.

President Obama. He was adamant about not negotiating with the GOP on the debt ceiling, and he deferred to congressional leaders on the day-to-day details. The strategy attracted criticism, but it worked.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). Pelosi knows how to lean on her caucus, and her vow that all Democrats would reject this week’s hastily arranged House GOP bill was the beginning of its demise.

Gov. Chris Christie (R-N.J.). The New Jersey governor’s stock for 2016 is rising, and he emphasized his Washington outsider credentials by recently saying, “If I were in the Senate, I’d kill myself.”

Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.). The Budget Committee ranking member pressed the GOP for a “clean” fiscal bill. His protest on the House floor was a huge hit on YouTube, attracting more than 2 million views.

Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Michael BennetMichael BennetOvernight Finance: Scoop – Trump team eyes dramatic spending cuts | Treasury pick survives stormy hearing Mnuchin: Debt limit increase important, unclear on 'clean' hike Live coverage: Senators grill Trump's Treasury pick MORE (D-Colo.). The jobs of the Democratic campaign chiefs got a lot easier because of the shutdown. The GOP’s poll numbers plummeted, increasing the chances the Senate remains in Democratic hands. Republicans are still favored to retain the House, but it’s not the slam dunk that it used to be.

Congressional staffers. The amendment crafted by Sen. David VitterDavid VitterLobbying World Bottom Line Republicans add three to Banking Committee MORE (R-La.) didn’t make it into the final bill. That measure would have eliminated the employer healthcare subsidies for congressional officials, something critics said would have led to “a brain drain” on Capitol Hill. Furthermore, staffers won’t have to worry about working Christmas Eve. The bill kicks the next fiscal showdown into early 2014.

Washington, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray. Gray, who is mulling running for another term, took on both parties on the government shutdown, which significantly affected the D.C. government. The photo of the in-your-face showdown with Reid, which ran on Page 1 of The Washington Post, boosted Gray’s stock.

Terry McAuliffe. Before the shutdown, McAuliffe had expanded his lead over Virginia GOP gubernatorial candidate Ken Cuccinelli. The shutdown didn’t help Cuccinelli in a state filled with government workers and contractors.

Women lawmakers. Female legislators took a leading role in trying to craft a bipartisan deal. Sen. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsGOP rep faces testy crowd at constituent meeting over ObamaCare DeVos vows to be advocate for 'great' public schools GOP senators introducing ObamaCare replacement Monday MORE (R-Maine) crafted a solution that didn’t catch fire, but she worked closely with a number of female senators on both sides of the aisle. Those members, who include Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteTen rumored Trump Cabinet picks who didn't get a job Sasse, Perdue join Armed Services Committee Avid pilot among GOP senators joining Transportation committee MORE (R-N.H.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiWhat we learned from Rick Perry's confirmation hearing Perry regrets saying he would abolish Energy Department Trump education pick to face Warren, Sanders MORE (R-Alaska) and Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharJustice requires higher standard than Sessions Booker is taking orders from corporate pharmaceuticals Trump could mean new momentum for drug imports MORE (D-Minn.), could form a new power base in the upper chamber.

Losers

BoehnerJohn BoehnerLast Congress far from ‘do-nothing’ Top aide: Obama worried about impeachment for Syria actions An anti-government ideologue like Mulvaney shouldn't run OMB MORE and his lieutenants. Boehner didn’t fight the ObamaCare defunding strategy until it was too late. Then, he embraced it. Boehner and his leadership deputies came up with creative legislation to jab the Senate, but they had no exit strategy. The result was another failure to unite House Republicans against Obama and Reid. Once again, the House caved to the Senate.

Trust in government. Congressional approval ratings increased after lawmakers rejected military intervention in Syria. Weeks later, they dropped like a stone amid shutdown politics. Washington is as unpopular as ever.

The economy. The shutdown cost the fragile economy at least $24 billion, according to a new estimate by Standard & Poor’s. It was a self-inflicted wound.

Vice President Biden. The possible 2016 presidential candidate played almost no role in the deal-making, a striking contrast to prior fiscal battles. Biden is respected on both sides of the aisle, but some Democrats on Capitol Hill have not been fond of the vice president’s negotiations with the GOP. Last weekend, Biden was vacationing at Camp David. Sen. John McCainJohn McCainSenate committee to vote Monday on Tillerson Trump fails to mention Clinton in inaugural address Hillary Clinton under microscope at inauguration MORE (R-Ariz.) cracked that Biden was in the witness protection program.

Immigration reform. Immigration was pushed to the side this fall, and the chances of a bill getting to Obama’s desk this Congress are slim.

GOP campaign committees. Donations to Republican committees seeking to retain the House and win the Senate are likely to take a hit. This was a demoralizing GOP defeat, and the hangover could last a while.

Mixed

Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzTrump's America: Businessmen in, bureaucrats out When Trump says 'Make America Great Again,' he means it Booker is taking orders from corporate pharmaceuticals MORE (R-Texas). The GOP base loves Cruz, evidenced by his triumph in the presidential straw poll at the Values Voters Summit this month. But many establishment Republicans don’t like Cruz — at all. Winning a GOP presidential nomination usually requires the help of kingmakers in Washington, D.C., something Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulDems blast Trump plans for deep spending cuts Trump team prepares dramatic cuts Paul, Lee call on Trump to work with Congress on foreign policy MORE (R-Ky.) has acknowledged through some of his actions. Cruz is taking a different path and will continue to take arrows in the back.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellSenate confirms first nominees of Trump era The new Washington elite schmoozes over lunch Trump takes first official acts at signing ceremony MORE (R-Ky.). McConnell has been hit by the left and the right for the deal, which he ironed out with Reid. Earlier this fall, McConnell was attacked by Sen. Tom CoburnTom CoburnCoburn: Trump's tweets aren't presidential The road ahead for America’s highways Rethinking taxation MORE (R-Okla.) for not being engaged. McConnell is being challenged in a primary but is favored to win. In the short term, the agreement hurts McConnell. But in the general election, it might help him. Win or lose, McConnell’s eleventh hour involvement cements his reputation as a legislator.

— Ian Swanson contributed.