Congress members gather for funeral and burial

Members of Congress canceled plans, bought plane tickets, traveled through multiple countries and crossed oceans in order to make it to Boston for Sen. Edward Kennedy’s (D-Mass.) funeral.

The third-longest-serving senator died late Tuesday night after a 15-month battle with brain cancer.

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The invitation-only funeral service is scheduled to begin at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Basilica in Roxbury, Mass. The church seats about 1,500 people.

President Barack ObamaBarack ObamaTrump spokeswoman: Position on immigration “not really complicated” Seven ways the Clinton Foundation failed to meet its transparency promises Administration proposes visa program for entrepreneurs MORE was set to deliver the eulogy at the basilica, a place Kennedy frequented in 2002 to pray for his daughter’s recovery as she successfully battled lung cancer. It gave the church a “special meaning for him as a place of hope and optimism,” according to a statement by Kennedy’s staff.

About 92 current and former members of the Senate were expected at the funeral mass as of press time, according to a Senate source.

Following the New England service, a select few lawmakers will follow the Kennedy family and the senator’s body south, flying into Andrews Air Force Base around 3 p.m. and making a stop at the Capitol around 4 p.m. to offer staffers and employees a chance to pay their respects at the base of the Senate’s east front stairs.

After the brief Capitol prayer service, the processional is scheduled to make its way down Constitution Avenue across the Potomac River to Arlington National Cemetery, where a bugler will be on hand to play for the senator’s family and friends at the 5:30 p.m. service.

While the direct route from Andrews Air Force Base to the Capitol was not publicly announced as of press time, Senate Sergeant at Arms Terry Gainer said to expect “rolling closures” along the route, which will likely be along Independence Avenue leading up to the Capitol and along sections of the National Mall.

The large contingent of senators headed to Boston on Saturday includes Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Reid10 most expensive House races McConnell: Senate won't take up TPP this year Politicians can’t afford to ignore Latinos MORE (D-Nev.), Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellClinton, Trump sharpen attacks Sanders, Merkley back McConnell decision to skip TPP vote John McCain: No longer a profile in courage MORE (R-Ky.), Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinTrump poised to betray primary supporters on immigration Dem wants hearing on EpiPen price hikes Legislators privacy fight coincides with FCC complaint MORE (D-Ill.) and Democratic Conference Vice Chairman Charles SchumerCharles SchumerTrump was wrong: Kaine is a liberal in a moderate's clothing Trump poised to betray primary supporters on immigration Rubio primary challenger loans campaign M MORE (N.Y.), though they are not planning on attending the burial at Arlington National Cemetery.

An extreme example of a lawmaker scrambling to make it to Boston is Rep. James McGovern (D-Mass.), who heard the news of Kennedy’s death while on a congressional delegation trip to Iraq and Afghanistan. McGovern cut that trip short and embarked on a marathon 26-hour journey from Kabul to Boston, with stops in Kuwait and Germany along the way, to ensure his arrival for Kennedy’s funeral.

“When we heard the news, there was never a question of whether Jim would come back, but how fast he could make it,” said Michael Mershon, spokesman for McGovern.

“Ted Kennedy was always there for him. Always. And it went beyond the political and legislative stuff. When Jim and Lisa’s first child was born, the very first call that Jim got at the hospital was from Ted Kennedy. And he wants to be there to say goodbye.”
Other lawmakers likewise rearranged their schedules.

Sen. Mark BegichMark BegichRyan's victory trumps justice reform opponents There is great responsibility being in the minority Senate GOP deeply concerned over Trump effect MORE (D-Alaska), for example, postponed a trip for Sens. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerDem senator pushes EPA on asbestos regulations Trump was wrong: Kaine is a liberal in a moderate's clothing Feds weigh whether carbon pollution should be measured in highway performance MORE (D-Calif.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersFive things to know about the Dakota Access Pipeline fight Latino Republicans split on Trump's outreach Teamsters endorse Clinton MORE (I-Vt.), Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) and Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowKaine: Being picked for VP feels like being 'kidnapped' GOP tries to link Dem candidates to Obama on Iran 'ransom' Dem senators to GOP: Dump Trump MORE (D-Mich.) to come to Alaska this weekend to view examples of the effects of climate change.

While many of the senators are arranging their own travel for Saturday’s service in Boston, Gainer’s office organized at least one bus to take senators to Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, where they will board a plane to fly to an undisclosed airfield in the Boston area. Officials were still discussing details of the trip as of press time.

While much of the House leadership is planning to be in Boston on Saturday, the Kennedy family did not extend invitations to the entire lower chamber, according to the House sergeant at arms’s office.

“It is a Senate event,” said Kerri Hanley, a spokeswoman for the office. “And the Kennedy family invited a few House members. They didn’t invite the entire House or anything like that because there’s too many of us, but they did invite a few House members.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is planning to attend the funeral in Boston, as will House Education and Labor Committee Chairman George Miller (D-Calif.), House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank (D-Mass.) and House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Henry Waxman (D-Calif.).

All of the living presidents are expected to join Obama in Boston, and in addition to local law enforcement, Gainer’s office has been working closely with the Secret Service and the military.

The Senate sergeant at arms typically chooses to coordinate its congressional transportation efforts with a branch of the military and opted for the Army for this weekend’s events because of Kennedy’s service in the Army from 1951 to 1953.

An international retinue, including Ireland’s Prime Minister Brian Cowen, is also expected to join the ranks for Saturday’s service.

Other lawmakers, like Rep. Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraBecerra: 'Immigrant basher' Trump won't explain how wife became citizen Sunday Shows Preview: Next steps after Trump's rough week Dem tensions explode in Hispanic Caucus over Trump MORE (D-Calif.), vice chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, are planning to attend the invitation-only burial at Arlington but are not making the trip to Boston.

In the days leading up to Saturday’s services, there was a steady and massive outpouring of public condolences offered to the family. The Kennedy family estimated that 25,000 people attended the wake on Thursday night at the JFK Library, which kept the building open to the public until 2 a.m.

As an expression of gratitude for Kennedy’s lifelong dedication to service on Capitol Hill, Senate officials presented the family with the flag flown over the Capitol on the last day of session in the Senate. It lay draped over Kennedy’s casket as mourners paid their respects.